French filmmaker Claude Lanzmann, creator of 'Shoah', dies at 92

Famous  French Filmmaker  Claude Lanzmann, passed away in Paris at the age of 92, as per his publishers Gallimard statement on Thursday.

He was also known for his writing and commentary. He made his name known all over the world for his short film "Shoah", a nine-hour thirty-minute oral history of the Holocaust.

Born in Paris in 1925 to a Jewish family, went to eastern Europe when the family migrated, he had to stay in France during Nazi regime and lived.

He started working with an oral history of the Holocaust, went on to interview the survivors, the people who were responsible for the heinous act which killed six million Jews by Nazis.

Subsequently, he made the film "Shoah" meaning Holocaust in Hebrew, released in 1985, after eleven years of struggle.

A man of letters and high learning, who spent much of the 1950s living with Simone de Beauvoir and working alongside Jean-Paul Sartre and other philosophers, Lanzmann was equally at home as an author, filmmaker, memoirist, journalist, and lecturer.

He was awarded the Legion d’honneur, France’s highest order of merit, for his work in 2006, and continued as editor of Les Temps Modernes, a journal founded by Sartre, into his 90s.     

More than nine hours in length, the film met with wide critical acclaim. Much of the raw footage and transcripts of interviews are held at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

 

 

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